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Roger Townsend's  Legal Resources

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FAMOUS QUOTES

"Opinions are like arse-holes, every one has one"                             J.  Maire    

"The individual who persecutes another because he is not of the same opinion is nothing less than a monster."       Voltaire.

          Voltaire (1694-1778)    The Philosophical Dictionary of Voltaire      Voltair on prejudice

 

To legislate in advance of public opinion is merely to produce anarchy instead of maintaining law and order." Alexander Mackenzie.

 

No man can come into a court of justice to seek the assistance of the law who founds his claim upon a contravention of the law." Morck v. Abel (1802).

 

"The People Know Their Rights, And They Are Never
Slow To Assert And Maintain Them, When They Are Invaded."
Abraham Lincoln

 

 

"Wherever the law ends, tyranny begins." John Locke

 

"Boys, I am here to keep order and to administer the law. Those who don't want law and order can 'git! But those who stay with the camp, remember on what side of the line the camp is for boys, if there is shooting in Kootenay, there'll be hangin' in Kootenay." Judge Peter O'Reilly to gold miners upon his arrival in a frontier town, 1864

 

"Let all the laws be clear, uniform and precise. To interpret laws is almost always to corrupt them." Voltaire.

 

"Whether you're an honest man or whether you're a thief depends on whose solicitor has given me a brief." W. S. Gilbert.

 

 

 

"Plain truth, I take it, needs no flowers of speech." Wilkes v. Wood (1763).

 

"Lawyers and painters can soon change white to black." Danish proverb

"Two farmers each claimed to own a certain cow. While one pulled on its head and the other pulled on its tail, the cow was milked by a lawyer." Jewish parable.

"Lawlessness works more harm to the state than any other cause. Under the reign of law, sanity and wisdom prevail ever among men." Solon

"A man may write himself out of reputation when nobody else can do it." Thomas Paine.

"Lawyers make a living trying to figure out what other lawyers have written." Will Rogers.

 

 

"What is the difference between common law and equity? Very little in the end. At common law, you are done for at once. In Equity, you are not so easily disposed of. The former is a bullet which is instantaneously and charmingly effective. The latter, an angler's hook, which plays the victim before it kills him. Common law is acid, equity is opium." Anon.

 

"The house of everyone is to him as his castle and fortress, as well for his defence against injury and violence as for his repose." Lord Coke, Semayne's Case (1605).

"In a thousand pounds of law there's not an ounce of love." Proverb (1678).

 

"If one man can be allowed to determine for himself what is law, every man can. That means first chaos, then tyranny. Legal process is an essential part of the democratic process." Justice Felix Frankfurter.

 

I have a dream by    Martin Luther King Jr.

Children Learn What They Live   Dorothy Law Nolte

 

By Dorothy Law Nolte

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

 

 

 

Sample   documents for Provincial and Superior Courts.

General   Discussion    Forum 

How to lay a Criminal Information PAGE

Sudbury Legal Resources Page

 

Latest confidential transcripts  from court

 

Form 19 to appeal to an Legal Aid Area Comittee concering a refusal to grant legal aid.

How to get bail money refunded

 

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Quotations of Voltaire for those who are interested.

If, in jurisprudence, it is not very advantageous to come to terms when one is in the right, and to plead when one is in the wrong.

 

In jurisprudence, take a clear case, in which the law speaks clearly; a bill of exchange properly prepared and accepted; the acceptor must be condemned to pay it in every country. There is therefore a useful jurisprudence, although in a thousand cases judgments are arbitrary, to the misfortune of the human race, because the laws are badly made.

 

One asks if one should encourage superstition in the people; see above all what is most extreme in this disastrous matter, St. Bartholomew, the massacres in Ireland, the crusades; the question is soon answered.

 

It is with all things as with colours; the weakest eyes distinguish black from white; the better, more practised eyes, discern shades that resemble each other.

 

A chicken-run is visibly the most perfect monarchic state. There is no king comparable to a cock. If he marches proudly in the midst of his people, it is not out of vanity. If the enemy approaches, he does not give orders to his subjects to go to kill themselves for him by virtue of his certain knowledge and plenary power; he goes to battle himself, ranges his chickens behind him and fights to the death. If he is the victor, he himself sings the Te Deum. In civil life there is no one so gallant, so honest, so disinterested. He has all the virtues. Has he in his royal beak a grain of corn, a grub, he gives it to the first lady among his subjects who presents herself. Solomon in his harem did not come near a poultry-yard cock.

 

 

There is no good code in any country. The reason for this is evident; the laws have been made according to the times, the place and the need, etc.

When the needs have changed, the laws which have remained, have become ridiculous. Thus the law which forbade the eating of pig and the drinking of wine was very reasonable in Arabia, where pig and wine are injurious; it is absurd at Constantinople.

 

 

I imagine that man likes and does harm only for his own advantage. But so many people are led to look for their own interest in the misfortune of others, vengeance is so violent a passion, there are such disastrous examples of it ambition, still more fatal, has inundated the world with so much blood, that when I retrace for myself the horrible picture, I am tempted to avow that man is a very devil.

WHAT is tolerance? it is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly--that is the first law of nature.

 

If it were permitted to reason consistently in religious matters, it is clear that we all ought to become Jews, because Jesus Christ our Saviour was born a Jew, lived a Jew, died a Jew, and that he said expressly that he was accomplishing, that he was fulfilling the Jewish religion. But it is clearer still that we ought to be tolerant of one another, because we are all weak, inconsistent, liable to fickleness and error. Shall a reed laid low in the mud by the wind say to a fellow reed fallen in the opposite direction : " Crawl as I crawl, wretch, or I shall petiion that you be torn up by the roots and burned?

 

" Truth is an abstract word which most men use indifferently in their books and judgments, for error and falsehood? " This definition would have been marvellously appropriate to all makers of systems. Similarly is the word " wisdom " taken often for folly, and " wit" for nonsense.

He who has heard the thing told by twelve thousand eye-witnesses, has only twelve thousand probabilities, equal to one strong probability, which is not equal to certainty.

 

From generation to generation scepticism increases, and probability diminishes; and soon probability is reduced to zero.

 

The same man had a violent quarrel at the Hague in Holland for having stoutly taken Barneveldt's part against an extravagant Gomarist. He was put into prison in Amsterdam for having said that priests are the scourge of humanity and the source of all our misfortunes. What!" he said. " If one believes that good works make for salvation, one finds oneself in a dungeon; if one laughs at a cock and an ass, one risks being hanged." This adventure, burlesque though it is, makes it quite clear that one can be reprehensible on one or two points in our hemisphere, and be absolutely innocent in the rest of the world.

 

 

WE have blind men, one-eyed men, squint-eyed men, men with long sight, short sight, clear sight, dim sight, weak sight. All that is a faithful enough image of our understanding; but we are barely acquainted with false sight. There are hardly men who always take a cock for a horse, or a chamber-pot for a house. Why do we often come across minds otherwise just enough, which are absolutely false on important things? Why does this same Siamese who will never let himself be cheated when there is question of counting him three rupees, firmly believe in the metamorphoses of Sammonocodom? By what strange singularity do sensible men resemble Don Quixote who thought he saw giants where other men saw only windmills? Still, Don Quixote was more excusable than the Siamese who believes that Sammonocodom came several times on earth, and than the Turk who is persuaded that Mahomet put half the moon in his sleeve; for Don Quixote, struck with the idea that he must fight giants, can figure to himself that a giant must have a body as big as a mill; but from what supposition can a sensible man set off to persuade himself that the half of the moon has gone into a sleeve, and that a Sammonocodom has come down from heaven to play at shuttlecock, cut down a forest, and perform feats of legerdemain?

 

FALSE MINDS

WE have blind men, one-eyed men, squint-eyed men, men with long sight, short sight, clear sight, dim sight, weak sight. All that is a faithful enough image of our understanding; but we are barely acquainted with false sight. There are hardly men who always take a cock for a horse, or a chamber-pot for a house. Why do we often come across minds otherwise just enough, which are absolutely false on important things? Why does this same Siamese who will never let himself be cheated when there is question of counting him three rupees, firmly believe in the metamorphoses of Sammonocodom? By what strange singularity do sensible men resemble Don Quixote who thought he saw giants where other men saw only windmills? Still, Don Quixote was more excusable than the Siamese who believes that Sammonocodom came several times on earth, and than the Turk who is persuaded that Mahomet put half the moon in his sleeve; for Don Quixote, struck with the idea that he must fight giants, can figure to himself that a giant must have a body as big as a mill; but from what supposition can a sensible man set off to persuade himself that the half of the moon has gone into a sleeve, and that a Sammonocodom has come down from heaven to play at shuttlecock, cut down a forest, and perform feats of legerdemain?

The greatest geniuses can have false judgment about a principle they have accepted without examination.